Oswestry Works

Locomotive works diorama in 4mm

Month: February, 2015

The Workhorses of Oswestry Yard

The Cambrian system featured relatively few Panniers compared to other corners of the GWR, the exception being Oswestry.   57xx, 74xx and 54xx classes were represented over the years, but the most numerous were the 16xx class.  These little Hawksworth engines were not introduced until 1949 but were pure GWR design, specifically built for light branch work and shunting.  At Oswestry they were employed extensively shunting in the yards, as station pilots or on the branches around the Oswestry area.   Oswestry shed had 10 class members on its books at various times between 1949 and 1962.  Of these, 1602, 1603, 1604 and 1636 had long associations, 1604 spending its whole life of 11 years at Oswestry.  1604 and 1636 are two that I’d like to model in Oswestry Works.

Tom Wright's 16xx and a NuCast 16xx

A while back I picked up a built NuCast 16xx with a view to improving the detailing and adding it to the works roster.  Other than replace it’s incorrect 57xx chimney with a 3D printed one its not had any other attention since I bought it.  In the mean time, Tom Wright has produced a very nice 3D printed 16xx, including frames available via Shapeways.   The design and build of the 3D model is chronicled here on RMWeb.  Tom has kindly modified his original design to exclude some details which I’d prefer to add myself, such as sprung buffers, etched lamp irons and the like.    I ordered it from Shapeway’s on the 17th Feb and today it arrived.

Tom Wright's 16xx

Tom Wright's 16xx

The model includes a body shell, OO gauge spaced frames with nem pockets and a separate smoke box door and roof.  It has a nice solid feel, the lines are crisp and the body shape is captured perfectly – thanks to Tom’s design skills.  The wall thickness is good, the cab sides in particular look better than some RTR offerings.   The main benefit over the B9C is being able to print the loco in one piece, whereas on the B9C due to the restrictions on the build volume at 30 microns, I’d have to print the loco in parts.  However, when it comes to the surface finish the grainy/frosted look needs attention.  The whole body is going to need sanding down, fine for the cab and tank sides but a challenge for anywhere else.  Finer details such as the boiler fittings and smoke box door will be easier to remove and replace with prints from the B9C.

The key point though is that the design itself is great and it will be another nice detailing project to get stuck into.  It’s the material that’s the problem (for me at least!) unfortunately, though I’m confident with some sanding and fine detailed parts it will really lift the model.  It will get the same treatment at 5726 – handrails, boiler fittings, buffer beam detail, pipework, scratch built pull rods and lamp irons etc and will be out shopped as 89A’s No.1604.

It will have to wait a little while though as I’m currently converting our garage into a workshop, I’ve had too many days in there with the temperature hovering just over freezing whilst I’ve been working on the printer!  With the garage/workshop finished in a few weeks time I’ll be ready to get the new 3D business going in earnest.  I’ve still been working my notice so I’ve not as yet been able to devote a lot time into getting things off the ground, but come the end of March 3D design, scanning and printing will become my day job! It’s a bit daunting/exciting/terrifying, but so far so good.  There should also be a surge in progress on the actual building of Oswestry Works in a few weeks, finally…

Being back in Wales now its been great to have Oswestry only an hour away. A couple of weeks ago I had my first experience volunteering with the Cambrian Heritage Railway, the days task being clearing out the cattle pens near the Coney Green.  About 12 of us spent the day tackling the undergrowth as well as clearing old sleepers from the mainline.  Back breaking work but great fun and a nice change to be working on the real thing!

Oswestry Cattle Pens

No.9000 – Back to Black

Considering the benefits 3D printing gives when tackling something like the top feed and sandboxes, there is still a good deal of traditional modelling required to integrate them into the model.  The sandbox pull rods have given me a few hours of amusement trying to solder them (mental note: now might be a good time to look into etching some!); the casing for the top feed pipe, where it runs up the side of the boiler, was equally challenging.  I’d originally tried used masking tape to replicate the thin metal that encases the pipe, but I didn’t get very good results.  Having some time away from the problem was what I needed and this morning I realised that tin foil would be perfect for the job.

Shaping tin foil around the top feed pipe

2 hours later I was still battling with the umpteenth strip of tin foil, having tried and failed with 3 different methods for accurately shaping it around the wire.  The final method which worked well enough was to bend some wire around another Dukedog boiler, take an inch long strip of tin foil about 2.5mm wide, tape one end to the boiler/wire and then smooth the tin foil down the wire making sure it shaped to the wire.   Then using a flattened end of a cocktail stick you can tease the tinfoil gentle into the wire.  Even at that stage the process is fraught with danger, as slightly too much pressure with the cocktail stick tears the tin foil.

Shaping tin foil around the top feed pipe

With that fiddly task completed I turned attention to the front of the loco.  No.9000 was one of a few class members that had a lamp iron on the smokebox door, another nice fiddly task to challenge me.  The lamp iron on the smokebox door would need to be quite fine so as not to jar with its surroundings, so I decided to use Shawplan Extreme Etchings Lamp Brackets as these are a lot finer than the Mainly Trains etch.   Iain Rice’s Etched Loco Construction was my guide for folding the etch into shape, not as tricky as I thought but still a testing task with the Hold’n’Fold.   To keep things the same I replaced the other lamp irons and for variation fitted a new smoke box dart.

P1180302

With those jobs finished the last task tonight was to mask and then coat with Halfords black primer.  This wasn’t quite as straight forward as with the Pannier as the open cab has fantastic detail which needed preserving.  A few layers of Tamiya masking tape did the job but for me it still takes a bit of a leap of faith when using maskol.  This time however I’m completely sold on it, it worked great used directly on the cab windows and peeled off easily after starting with a cocktail stick.

P1180304 P1180305

Of course once the primer is on then the niggles start to show.  The top feed has an unsightly gap where it meets the boiler that I’d forgot to tackle, I think I’ll have to try some modelling putty and another coat of primer.  Anyways, that’s it for now, I’m waiting on the numbers still so No.9000 will go back into the queue.  I think it might now be time to blow the dust of the High Level Chassis for No.5726! I’m booked onto the Loco building course at Missenden in March, so I think making a start on the kit now would be good and I’ll take a Comet Manor and Mogul chassis’ to Missenden as I imagine they will be quite a lot harder.

P1180307 P1180308 P1180310