Oswestry Works

Locomotive works diorama in 4mm

Tag: shapeways

The Workhorses of Oswestry Yard

The Cambrian system featured relatively few Panniers compared to other corners of the GWR, the exception being Oswestry.   57xx, 74xx and 54xx classes were represented over the years, but the most numerous were the 16xx class.  These little Hawksworth engines were not introduced until 1949 but were pure GWR design, specifically built for light branch work and shunting.  At Oswestry they were employed extensively shunting in the yards, as station pilots or on the branches around the Oswestry area.   Oswestry shed had 10 class members on its books at various times between 1949 and 1962.  Of these, 1602, 1603, 1604 and 1636 had long associations, 1604 spending its whole life of 11 years at Oswestry.  1604 and 1636 are two that I’d like to model in Oswestry Works.

Tom Wright's 16xx and a NuCast 16xx

A while back I picked up a built NuCast 16xx with a view to improving the detailing and adding it to the works roster.  Other than replace it’s incorrect 57xx chimney with a 3D printed one its not had any other attention since I bought it.  In the mean time, Tom Wright has produced a very nice 3D printed 16xx, including frames available via Shapeways.   The design and build of the 3D model is chronicled here on RMWeb.  Tom has kindly modified his original design to exclude some details which I’d prefer to add myself, such as sprung buffers, etched lamp irons and the like.    I ordered it from Shapeway’s on the 17th Feb and today it arrived.

Tom Wright's 16xx

Tom Wright's 16xx

The model includes a body shell, OO gauge spaced frames with nem pockets and a separate smoke box door and roof.  It has a nice solid feel, the lines are crisp and the body shape is captured perfectly – thanks to Tom’s design skills.  The wall thickness is good, the cab sides in particular look better than some RTR offerings.   The main benefit over the B9C is being able to print the loco in one piece, whereas on the B9C due to the restrictions on the build volume at 30 microns, I’d have to print the loco in parts.  However, when it comes to the surface finish the grainy/frosted look needs attention.  The whole body is going to need sanding down, fine for the cab and tank sides but a challenge for anywhere else.  Finer details such as the boiler fittings and smoke box door will be easier to remove and replace with prints from the B9C.

The key point though is that the design itself is great and it will be another nice detailing project to get stuck into.  It’s the material that’s the problem (for me at least!) unfortunately, though I’m confident with some sanding and fine detailed parts it will really lift the model.  It will get the same treatment at 5726 – handrails, boiler fittings, buffer beam detail, pipework, scratch built pull rods and lamp irons etc and will be out shopped as 89A’s No.1604.

It will have to wait a little while though as I’m currently converting our garage into a workshop, I’ve had too many days in there with the temperature hovering just over freezing whilst I’ve been working on the printer!  With the garage/workshop finished in a few weeks time I’ll be ready to get the new 3D business going in earnest.  I’ve still been working my notice so I’ve not as yet been able to devote a lot time into getting things off the ground, but come the end of March 3D design, scanning and printing will become my day job! It’s a bit daunting/exciting/terrifying, but so far so good.  There should also be a surge in progress on the actual building of Oswestry Works in a few weeks, finally…

Being back in Wales now its been great to have Oswestry only an hour away. A couple of weeks ago I had my first experience volunteering with the Cambrian Heritage Railway, the days task being clearing out the cattle pens near the Coney Green.  About 12 of us spent the day tackling the undergrowth as well as clearing old sleepers from the mainline.  Back breaking work but great fun and a nice change to be working on the real thing!

Oswestry Cattle Pens

B9 Creator first print

After a week or so of tinkering I’ve had my first successful print from the B9 Creator v1.2 HD.  This model is capable of 30 micron xy axis, though with quite a small build area at that resolution of 57.6 mm (2.67″) x 32.4 mm (1.28″) x 203.2 mm (8.0″).   By tilting your 3D model you can however print slightly larger objects.

Supports being added in the B9C software
In September I’d had Tebee’s Welshpool & Llanfair Beyer Peacock & Co 0-6-0T printed on a Statasys Objet Eden 260V, at 200 micron xy and 16 micron z.  I figured this print would set a bar to measure against once I’d got the B9 operational.  So far, with a little more tweaking I think the B9 comes out better with less striping and improved detail, the material is also much tougher.
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Some jewellers on the B9 Creator forums have been having good results with a 1:1 mix of the B9 Red and Cherry resins, so that is the material I’ve started out with at 30 micron XY and Z.  Over Christmas I’ll be trying the same print with pure Cherry and Spot-HT.  It’s been quite a learning curve to get something productive, mainly because a UV filter hadn’t been removed from the projector assembly which meant to get anything to print I had to use much higher exposure times.  Thankfully B9C support were able to quickly identify the issue and from that point onwards I’ve been able to print using default settings.  I think I’ll try for longer settle times on the next print as I think these will help to reduce some traces of lines in the print where the resin has been curing as its still settling.

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